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Free Barcode Font Download: Code 39 (3 of 9) Unrestricted

by Matthew Kostanecki | Last Updated: May 10th, 2022 | Barcoding | 47 comments

Free code 39 fonts without restrictions can be hard to come by. Which is why we decided we would make one ourselves! This font is completely free to download and use forever. No strings attached. We’ve also included a Code 39 font without text in case you need something that is machine readable only.

You can download both code 39 fonts here:

Get the inFlow Code 39 fontYou are minutes away from typing out barcodes

If you’d like to know how a barcode font can help your business, read on!

What is a Code 39 (also known as Code 3 of 9) barcode font?

A barcode is just a visual representation of data that can be read quickly by a computer. Think of it like a nickname that a scanner reads and translates into text on the screen.

A Code 39 barcode is just a standard symbology (format) that most barcode scanners can easily read. It was named Code 3 of 9 since, initially, you could only use 39 characters (the 26 letters in the English alphabet, numbers 0-9, and some special characters such as “-” and “.”).

Why should you set up a barcode system?

Code 39 barcodes are the simplest and easiest to use when creating an internal barcoding system at your small business.

Barcodes also scale well as your business grows. In fact, Code 3 of 9 barcodes are heavily used in the automotive industry, as well as the U.S. Department of Defense. If you’d like an idea of how to get started with barcoding, we’ve made a quick video on how to set up a barcode system.

How To Set Up A Barcode System | inFlow Inventory software

Why is a barcode font useful?

There are many ways to make barcodes; however, using barcode fonts is probably one of the easiest ways to get started. All you really need to create a barcode using a font is a  Windows or Mac program that supports True Type fonts. Some examples include Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access, Microsoft Excel, and QuickBooks. With just a few clicks you can install the font and you’ll be ready to go! 

And, of course, once you can easily create barcodes, you’re on your way to creating an efficient system for tracking and managing your inventory.

You should keep in mind that the code 39 font is best used for internal use. If you’re planning on selling your products on Amazon or any big retailers, then you’ll want to get UPCs. You can buy UPCs directly from the source, GS1 US, which now offers single UPCs for $30 with no renewal fee. If you’re curious why GS1 barcodes are important you can learn more here.

How do I install the Code 39 barcode font?

It’s really simple to install a font in Windows. Simply double click the font file after you download it and click “install” on the next window that pops up. You can also try right clicking the “inFlow Code 39 Barcode.ttf” or “Code 39 – Machine Readable.ttf” font files and select the install option right from that menu.

Code 39 font installer window

For OS X 10.3 or above, all you need to do is double click the font file and click the “install font” button at the bottom of the preview.

Next, in any program that uses fonts, such as Microsoft Word or Excel, you can change your data into a barcode by selecting “inFlow Code 39 Barcode” as the font. Or if you’d like the machine readable only option you would select “Code 39 Machine Readable” It’s like turning any program into a barcode generator!

How do I use the Code 39 barcode font?

If you wanted to change “1321MTLW” into a barcode, you would first write it out with a regular font, highlight it, and then change the font to “inFlow Code 39 Barcode”. Here’s what it looks like:

code 39 font in word

It’s also important to note that you must add an asterisk (*) to the beginning and end of your data. This is because scanners look for this character to know where to start and stop reading the barcode.

So, for example, to create a barcode of “1321MTLW,” you would enter “*1321MTLW*” in your word processor.

It’s also important to note that the * characters won’t show up when the barcode is scanned. So for example, scanning “*1321MTLW*” as a barcode will simply return “1321MTLW.”

Another good tip for finding the font quickly in the font list after it’s installed is to start typing “inFlow Code 39 Barcode” or “Code 39 Machine Readable” when your font list is selected. This way, you can avoid having to scroll through your font list.

We stress-tested the font with the inFlow Smart Scanner and found that the font could be reliably read at size 24 if you’re printing with a basic inkjet printer. However, we did have some success with a font size as small as 16. 

Keep in mind adding spaces will create two separate barcodes so you’ll need to use a hyphen or dash in lieu of spaces.

How do I put barcodes on my products?

To make the barcode font more useful and actually get barcodes on your items, you can print them out using sticky label paper. We’ve found the Avery series of label stickers is affordable and easy to set up. They have many options for both laser and inkjet printers.

Simply use the template provided by the manufacture (typically in Microsoft Word) and format your labels accordingly.

Now, all you have to do is peel and stick the barcodes to your products!

How do barcode fonts fit in the big picture?

Using barcode fonts is just one step in a series to start tracking and managing your inventory more efficiently. Below are all the steps you need to get an inventory tracking system started:

  1. Assign your items a product code.
  2. Turn product codes into barcodes by using the Code 39 barcode font.
  3. Print those barcodes using labels or a special barcode printer.
  4. Use inventory software so your computer can use barcodes to manage your inventory.

Check out our free e-book, too!

If you’re looking for more detailed information on how to get a complete barcoding system working for your business, you should download our free PDF book “Barcode Your Small Business”. This eBook won’t bog you down with technical jargon. It teaches you all about barcoding quickly and efficiently, walking you through all the steps above and more. A short read that’s straight to the point. What’s not to love?

Click here to download your copy!

Or if you’d like a handy reference guide for some of the most widely used acronyms in the world of barcoding you can read our barcode glossary.

Looking for inventory software that’s barcode friendly?

Our free barcode font is great for helping you create labels quickly and easily, but you’ll want to use those labels with inventory software that can read them. That’s where inFlow Cloud comes in.

We’ve designed inFlow with barcodes in mind, so you can scan them straight into purchase or sales orders to speed things up. inFlow Cloud also integrate with DYMO printers, so you can quickly print labels for all your current stock, or newly received stock.

Start barcoding with inFlow

No credit card required. Sign up now!

Matthew Kostanecki

Matthew Kostanecki

Matthew Kostanecki is speaker, author, and active contributor to the small business community. He leads the marketing and business development for inFlow Inventory.

47 Comments

  1. Eve

    i am trying to use the free3of9x font in excel and then word to print labels–but the number/letter combos of each code are not showing up below the barcode lines. i need to be able to see both. what should be done? thanks

    Reply
  2. Eve

    please note i am using a macbook with 2011 office

    Reply
  3. Matthew Kostanecki

    Hi Eve

    It’s an extra step, but you can write the text out again under the barcode and change the font to something readable. So your labels would have two lines, the first using the 3 of 9 font and the second using something like Arial.

    Let me know if that helps!
    -Matt

    Reply
  4. Raj

    I am trying to make unique barcodes for different forms fro excel, but the barcode is not scanned with a scanner. Please suggest, how to do?

    Reply
    • Matthew Kostanecki

      Are you including the * characters before and after you make the code? Those work as start/stop characters. What scanner are you using? Have you tried enlarging the font?

      Reply
  5. Michael LeFrank

    Using Code 39, I have created a Excel file and entered the 4-digit number of our members. I placed * at the start and end of the value. I highlighted the row and changed the font to Free 3 of 9. A blocky-looking code is produced, but Member 1001 looks exactly the same as 1002, 1003, etc.

    Reply
    • Matthew Kostanecki

      Hi Michael

      Sorry to hear you’re having some trouble. I’ll get in touch via email to troubleshoot. I was able to successfully create the code in excel myself.

      Cheers,
      -Matt

      Reply
    • Matthew Kostanecki

      I was also able to confirm that although the actual blocks look very similar, they do scan correctly. For example, *1001* comes up as 1001 and *1002* comes up as 1002 as they should (even though visually they look really close!)

      Reply
  6. Anayet

    I don’t know why but while using small letters first like “*c9366*” it gives me back ” c9366″ How to overcome this?
    If anyone can help me or has any suggestions please reply…

    Reply
  7. John LeClair

    I have retail racks in stores that hold 450 6 x 12 inch boards that hold Mosaic samples. Each board has a number example B1098. There’s not a lot of room on the preferred top right corner. I would need a barcode that would be small enough say 1/2 inch by 1/2 inch or even smaller. is that possible?

    Reply
    • Thomas Wong

      Hi John! Sorry, for the late reply to this. We haven’t tested our barcode font at sizes that small, as these were meant more for small/medium-sized items that have boxes.
      But the good news is that it’s pretty easy and cheap to try, and you can even do it with a Letter-sized piece of paper.
      I’d suggest using our font and print out a few different sizes, and see how small a barcode size your scanner is able to distinguish.

      – Thomas

      Reply
  8. Billy Jack Newman

    This article was great for helping move in the right direction for asset inventory control.
    I have a small brewery in my garage and i have been open for 5 years now. I need to move out of garage into a retail place and i plan on keg distribution. I am in need of making a tracking database not only so i know what i have on hand but to also know where my kegs are if not here. i have downloaded the pdf. and i hope this will walk me through the process. I am a little intimidated by computers but i do know beer. Wish me lulck

    Reply
  9. Anurag Jain

    Hi Team,

    I’ve downloaded free3of9.ttf & free3of9x.ttf fonts for reports. On executing the report, distorted barcode image is displayed, some extra text is displayed on the image. I’m able to scan the barcode properly. Also, this issue occurs randomly on the records.

    Do I need to go for license product to resolve this issue? Any help will be appreciated

    Reply
    • Thomas Wong

      Hi Anurag,
      Sorry I wish I could give you a clearer answer to this, but it would be highly dependent on which app you’re using and how much space is in each column of the report.
      I don’t think you necessarily need a licensed barcode font. It sounds like there may just not be enough space for the code39 font in that report, or you might have to try a smaller font size for it to display properly.

      Regards,
      Thomas

      Reply
  10. Kelly Groenewold

    Hi,
    I have followed all the directions to make a bar coded label with my Microsoft Word program. I am having great difficulty with getting my scanner to read the bar codes I create with Word using the bar code font you recommend above. I’ve made a test page with various font sizes, with preceding and following *’s and without. I am using the extended version so I an use upper and lower case letters and numbers and some special characters. Please advise as to what I am doing incorrectly, because I know it should work! 🙂 Thanks,

    Reply
    • Thomas Wong

      Hi Kelly,
      One quick question: were you printing that test page out?
      Not all barcode scanners can easily read computer screens, so I’d suggest printing the barcodes out if you haven’t done so already (and definitely use the asterisks at the beginning and end).
      I’d also suggest trying our other barcode, which has readable text below each entry: https://www.inflowinventory.com/blog/code-39-font-archon-free-barcode/

      – Thomas

      Reply
  11. VINOD JAIN

    i am using data example *MGS01234* LAST FIVE DIGIT FOR MY PRODUCT CODE USING FONT BARCODE 39 AND FONT SIZE 14 WHEN I PRINT THE BARCODE LABEL SOME LABEL NOT SCAN PROPERLY

    Reply
    • Thomas Wong

      Hi Vinod,

      Hrmm, in that case I might try increasing the font size to something like 16 or 18, and trying again. Depending on the length of the barcode, you may have to play with the distance of the scanner too. Try holding the scanner closer or farther from the code until you hear the beep.

      Reply
  12. justseegoods

    Great. Your article was very useful. Thanks for your sharing.

    Reply
  13. Aun

    Hi

    May i ask more detail of 2 fonts, is it free for commercial use ?

    FRE3OF9X.TTF
    FREE3OF9.TTF

    Reply
    • Thomas Wong

      Hi Aun, the font we provide is free for use without restrictions. However, it’s probably best used for internal use and not for selling at other retailers. If you want to sell your products with barcodes at another store, you’ll likely need registered barcodes from GS1 (and you need to pay to license those).

      Reply
  14. Amrish

    Can I change the size of 3of9 barcode? i.e. from 8 to 12 to look bigger ans scan correctly. If yes, How?

    Reply
    • Thomas Wong

      Hi Amrish! Yes, you can change the font size of our 3of9 font. You’d just use the font adjustment in Word or whichever program you’re using to write. When you increase the font size, the actual barcode will get larger too.

      Reply
  15. Helen

    Are there any barcode fonts don’t display human-readable barcode? I don’t want my number displaying under the barcode. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Thomas Wong

      Hi Helen, this is the right page for that. The second link on this page has our first barcode font, which is displays no human-readable characters.

      Reply
  16. Todd

    How can a solid bar code be made using two words with a space in between them? Example: the word (bar code) will turn into two bar codes instead of one.Thank you,

    Reply
    • Thomas Wong

      Hi Todd, as far as I know the spaces will break up a barcode, so you would end up with two instead of one.
      However, you should be able to use a hyphen or dash to break up the text. I just tried it with our free Archon CODE39 font and that worked.

      Reply
  17. AC

    Just found your barcode font and successfully integrated into an Access 2010 Report. Thanks for making it clear in the info that you need to add * at the beginning and end of the data string in order to be able to scan it. Very nice. Thank you!

    Reply
  18. Atif Asif

    I Like It

    Reply
  19. Shaun

    Is it possible to use a tab character (ASCII character 8)

    Reply
    • Thomas

      You can enter tabs with our Archon Code 39 font, but it will break up the current barcode and put you in position to start a new one. Basically it’s a large horizontal space — it won’t be something you can scan.

      Reply
  20. Dayle

    Thank you for the guidance..

    Reply
  21. carlos Garcia

    tankyou from guatemala city

    Reply
  22. Philip Puch

    Do you have a code 3 of 9 version that prints the human readable portion above the Barcode ? My tape library seems to require it.

    Great font, Thanks!

    Reply
    • Thomas

      Sorry Philip, the only one we offer has the characters below the barcode.

      Reply
  23. swapan

    thanks

    Reply
  24. Juan Carlos Castillo

    Tengo un pc mac pero el codigo de barras parece que instala solo microsoft.

    I have a pc mac and the source not install only works in microsoft?

    Reply
    • Thomas

      Hi Juan Carlos, the font works in other apps too, not just Microsoft apps.

      Reply
  25. Ihsan

    need to barcode font

    Reply
  26. Jean

    My barcode password must contain both upper and lowercase letters or it will say password incorrect/invalid. How do I setup the following barcode?

    4hje3vq%4veq

    Reply
  27. Carmen Lane

    How much does it cost to subscribe?

    Reply
  28. Andreas Heldal-Lund

    Hi,

    Why does the font not support the hashtag # ? Need it to configure my barcode reader.

    Reply
    • Thomas

      Sorry Andreas, our CODE39 font just doesn’t support the hash symbol. We might consider it for a future CODE-128 font though!

      Reply
  29. Yaser Al Aghbari

    thanks U

    Reply
  30. Singaram Thyagarajan

    Why 3 of 9 barcode true type font is not showing up on a AIX server

    Reply

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